How to Upcycle Peanut Butter Jars

This DIY project is great for two reasons. 1- Depending on what materials you already have lying around, this project can be free or almost free. And 2- It uses old peanut butter jars that would otherwise just go in the recycling bin (thrifty and environmentally friendly!).

What you will need:

  • Empty jars (I used Teddy peanut butter jars. You could use canning jars too.)
  • Spray paint for metal
  • Labels (see below)

First you will have to start by collecting some jars. They don’t have to be peanut butter jars but they should be glass with metal tops. Wash and dry the jars and tops. (Hint: to remove peanut butter easily fill the container half way with vinegar and let it sit for a few hours or overnight flipping and shaking occasionally.)

When your jars are clean and dry take a piece of sand paper and rough up the metal top a little bit. This ensures that the paint will adhere to the top and not just peel off. Wash again to get rid of any dust you create from sanding.

Spray paint according to the cans instructions. My tops turned out a little bit bumpy on top because we didn’t spray them in a warm enough place but they still look fine.

While the tops are drying remove the labels from the jars by soaking in warm soapy water. The labels will peel off easily when they are saturated. (You can also do this step when cleaning the jars.)For the labels you will need:

  • 2.5in circle labels from staples (my brand was Avery)
  • a printer

Avery has a really good online label making program that lets you choose your design or upload your own. I used my own design simply because I think it’s fun to create designs but you definitely don’t need to. There are a number of nice designs on Avery’s website as well as lots of free designs floating around the internet.

Print 2 labels for each jar, one for the top and one for the side.

A few tips: I spent some time scrapping off loose paint around the edge of the lids as well as the bit of paint that got on the inside of the lids. I didn’t want any paint flaking off into my food. I was also very careful to clean up all of the paint dust so that my daughter wouldn’t touch it while crawling around the house. Lastly, let the spray painted lids cure until they don’t smell like paint anymore (a few days or more).

What other ways can you reuse things that would otherwise go into the recycling bin?

this post is linked up atPoor and Gluten Free, Homestead Revival Craft Yourself Crazy, and The Chicken Chick 



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12 thoughts on “How to Upcycle Peanut Butter Jars

  1. kalamitykelli

    I found you through You can take the girl outta the country but you can’t take the country outta the girl on Facebook! I had 2 jars – one peanut butter and one nutella sitting in the pantry just waiting on something cool to do with it – thanks!! This is a great tip – following now! And I will be using this for holiday presents!

    Reply
  2. Cindy Nardo Gross

    We never find peanutbutter in glass jars any more always plastic,but I also save these. Mine are usually wide mouthed so I clean them up. And use them to freeze soups, sauces ,and stocks.

    Reply
  3. 'Becca

    Nice! I reuse glass jars for many purposes, but I’m not so elegant as to print labels for them. One advantage to jars with the original label removed and no new label, if you use them for food storage, you can put them in the dishwasher without worrying that the label will come off and gum up the works. Your jars look very nice, though! Storing dry stuff like pumpkin seeds, you won’t need to wash them except to rub out with a damp cloth between batches of seeds.

    Reply

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